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Note-taking techniques

Mind maps

Mind maps, also known as concept maps or spider diagrams, help you to get ideas down on paper when you can't think where to start. They help you see connections and provide an overview of key points.

Mind maps are also used as a visual technique in revision.

Example of a computer-generated mind map

The topic in figure 1 below is taken from the study material for Y156, Understanding Children. It's about attachment relationships in young children and babies, and this forms the central idea and starting point in the mind map.

Other relevant ideas and information from the study material are connected to the central hub and to each other. As the mind map grows and changes ideas are organised to reflect the main points in the materials, such as how the quality of the attachment relationship in early life can affect the ability to form an attachment relationship to babies and children later in life. If it helps visually you can use colour to represent different ideas.

This computer-generated mind map uses nodes and links between them to illustrate ideas about attachment relationships.

Figure 1: Example of a computer-generated mind map

The computer-generated mind map in Figure 2 uses nodes and links between them to illustrate how proteins are obtained in the diet, their structure and function within the body, and what disorders are linked to them. It gives an overview of a great deal of information at a glance.

Figure 2: Example of a computer-generated mind map from a level 2 module

Example of a hand-drawn mind map

This hand-drawn mind map uses nodes and links between them to illustrate how proteins are obtained in the diet, their structure and function within the body, and what disorders are linked to them. It gives an overview of a great deal of information at a glance.

Figure 3: Example of a hand-drawn mind map

Last updated 4 months ago