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Overcoming barriers to study if you have a disability or health condition: What kind of adjustments might be available?

Page 5 of 7

Note: This is public information, if you've already registered you can access more detailed information in Disabled student support

Where to find accessibility information

Go to the qualification you’re interested in at Courses home. Under the Course details tab you’ll find a paragraph on accessibility, which tells you about the elements that make up the qualification.

course details tab

There's a guide to the number of hours of study per week under the Am I ready? tab. If you're a disabled student your study is likely to take longer than the guide hours suggest.

am i ready? tab

If your course has a mandatory residential school module it will be described under the Fees & funding tab.

Fees abd funding tab

Course elements and examples of adjustments by subject area

Click on the subject area associated with your qualification to show/hide information on the course elements and the potential adjustments available through a combination of Open University support and Disabled Students' Allowance funded support (DSA).

Arts & Humanities

Course elements Examples of adjustments that may be available
Reading large amounts of text

Other formats (included within the module website)

  • Ebook (epub2)
  • Kindle ebook
  • Word - optimised for screen readers
  • DAISY Digital Talking Book versions of module materials

Some formats are not available for all modules

Other formats, equipment and software

  • Comb-bound pages which lie flat so they can be read while lying down or with a magnifier
  • Enlarged print (A4 to A3)
  • Braille production upon request in advance
  • Synthetic speech software for reading written work (DSA)
  • Equipment to convert printed text to speech (DSA)
  • Magnifiers, special glasses, task-lighting or portable CCTV text magnifiers
Considerable amounts of time using a computer and the internet
(Looking at a screen)
  • Computer skills guides, help and advice
  • Printed versions of text within online modules available upon request
  • Ergonomic furniture (DSA)
  • A computer with voice-recognition (DSA)
  • Screen magnification software (DSA)
  • Computers with screen-reading software (DSA)
  • Large screen (DSA), large text, or different display colours
Some modules use visual resources
  • Detailed figure descriptions of key visual material
  • Arranging a sighted assistant to provide descriptions (DSA)
  • Some modules have alternative assessments using books with tactile images
  • Art History modules involve visual analysis of works of art - get in touch if you think this learning outcome may present a challenge
Audio/video media clips, and interactive activities
  • Written transcripts and/or subtitles with audio-visual components
  • Some content may not be compatible with all assistive software (every effort is being made to make as many components as possible accessible); equivalent content may be created where necessary.
  • For advice you can contact our Student Recruitment and Support service, then once you've registered your student support team will advise you
Finding external or third-party material online
  • There may be an alternative version of the activity that still provides evidence of learning, for example, talking through the steps and decisions that you would have taken.
  • OU Library provides a supported literature searching service (further into qualification)
Working with specialist material
(Such as works of art and musical manuscripts)
  • Musical notation and foreign language materials may be particularly difficult to use with assistive software.
  • Music notation can be provided in Music XML which enables export it into Sibelius, Braille, Musescore (ideal for screen reader users) or Musical Stave Notation.
  • For advice you can contact our Student Recruitment and Support service, then once you've registered your student support team will advise you
Using specialist software
(For example, the Sibelius music writing package)
  • Some content may not be compatible with all assistive software (every effort is being made to provide as much compatibility as possible); if you have any concerns contact our Student Recruitment and Support service
Study intensity

If you're a disabled student, studying is likely to take longer so take this into account

  • Take the opportunity to pace your study - one module per year or up to 60 credits per year
  • If you get behind, your tutor can help you prioritise, and there are time management and study skills resources
  • An Access course could provide you with a gradual start and give you the opportunity to develop your study skills
Interaction with tutor and other students
(Mostly via online conferencing (audio, screen share and message board), forums and wikis)
  • Many modules deliver tutorials online - some are recorded for later playback
  • You can request handouts before tutorials
  • Communication support (DSA)
  • Portable personal loops if you use a hearing aid
  • You can use text messages to communicate with your tutor
  • Request written communication
  • Creating an environment that suits listening and lip-reading for any face-to-face meetings
Some MA qualification modules have a day school
  • Funding money towards transport costs (DSA)
  • Each school has a team of staff to offer support and guidance
  • An online alternative learning experience may be available
  • Specialist equipment borrowing
  • Assistants
  • Campus transport
  • Other formats (see above)
Notetaking and assignment writing
  • Digital voice recorders
  • Computers with voice-recognition and speech to text (DSA)
  • Additional arrangements for assignments

Business & Management

Course elements Examples of adjustments that may be available
Reading large amounts of text

Other formats (included within the module website)

  • Ebook
  • Interactive ebook
  • Kindle ebook
  • Word
  • PDF version of web pages
  • DAISY Digital Talking Book versions of module materials
  • PDF versions of webpages (for online modules)
  • PDF versions of printed material (some components may not be fully screen reader accessible)

Some formats are not available for all modules

Other formats, equipment and software:

  • Comb-bound pages which lie flat so they can be read while lying down or with a magnifier
  • Enlarged print (A4 to A3)
  • Braille production upon request in advance
  • Synthetic speech software for reading written work (DSA)
  • Equipment to convert printed text to speech (DSA)
  • Magnifiers, special glasses, task-lighting or portable CCTV text magnifiers
Considerable amounts of time using a computer and the internet
(Looking at a screen)
  • Computer skills guides, help and advice
  • Printed versions of text within online modules available upon request
  • Ergonomic furniture (DSA)
  • A computer with voice-recognition (DSA)
  • Screen magnification software (DSA)
  • Computers with screen-reading software (DSA)
  • Large screen (DSA), large text, or different display colours
Some modules use visual resources
  • Detailed figure descriptions of key visual material
  • Arranging a sighted assistant to provide descriptions (DSA)
Audio/video media clips, and interactive activities
  • Written transcripts and/or subtitles with audio-visual components
  • Some content may not be compatible with all assistive software (every effort is being made to make as many components as possible accessible); equivalent content may be created where necessary.
  • For advice you can contact our Student Recruitment and Support service, then once you've registered your student support team will advise you
Finding external or third-party material online
(MSc in Finance requires students access external databases e.g. from the World Bank website)
  • There may be an alternative version of the activity that still provides evidence of learning, for example, talking through the steps and decisions that you would have taken.
  • OU Library provides a supported literature searching service (further into qualification)
Working with specialist material (Mathematical and scientific expressions)
  • Mathematical notation and associated techniques may be particularly difficult to use with assistive software
  • For advice you can contact our Student Recruitment and Support service, then once you've registered your student support team will advise you
Using specialist software
(A quantitative dissertation for MSc in Finance will require the use of statistical software such as STATA and the compulsory module, B860 Research methods in finance, requires substantial use of spreadsheets)
  • Some content may not be compatible with all assistive software (every effort is being made to provide as much compatibility as possible) If you have any concerns contact our Student Recruitment and Support service
Study intensity

If you're a disabled student, studying is likely to take longer so take this into account

  • Take the opportunity to pace your study - one module per year or up to 60 credits per year
  • If you get behind, your tutor can help you prioritise and there are time management and study skills resources
  • An Access course could provide you with a gradual start and give you the opportunity to develop your study skills
Interaction with tutor and other students
(Mostly via online conferencing (audio, screen share and message board), forums and wikis)
  • Many modules deliver tutorials online - some are recorded for later playback
  • You can request handouts before tutorials
  • Communication support (DSA)
  • Portable personal loops if you use a hearing aid
  • You can use text messages to communicate with your tutor
  • Request written communication
  • Creating an environment that suits listening and lip-reading for any face-to-face meetings
Some modules have a residential school
(Postgraduate modules only)
  • Funding money towards transport costs (DSA)
  • Each school has a team of staff to offer support and guidance
  • An online alternative learning experience may be available
  • Specialist equipment borrowing
  • Assistants
  • Campus transport
  • Other formats (see above)
Notetaking and assignment writing
  • Digital voice recorders
  • Computers with voice-recognition and speech to text (DSA)
  • Additional arrangements for assignments

Computing & IT

Some modules within this subject area have Accessibility Guides that provide information on course elements that may present an accessibility challenge and detail on adjustments that have been made. Look for Accessibility Guide under resources/accessibility when you access your module website after enrolment.

Course elements Examples of adjustments that may be available
Reading large amounts of text

Other formats (included within the module website)

  • Ebook
  • Kindle ebook
  • Word
  • DAISY Digital Talking Book versions of module materials
  • PDF versions of webpages (for online modules)
  • PDF versions of printed material (some components may not be fully screen reader accessible)

Some formats are not available for all modules

Other formats, equipment and software:

  • Comb-bound pages which lie flat so they can be read while lying down or with a magnifier
  • Enlarged print (A4 to A3)
  • Braille production upon request in advance
  • Synthetic speech software for reading written work (DSA)
  • Equipment to convert printed text to speech (DSA)
  • Magnifiers, special glasses, task-lighting or portable CCTV text magnifiers
Considerable amounts of time using a computer and the internet
(Looking at a screen)
  • Computer skills guides, help and advice
  • Printed versions of text within online modules available upon request
  • Ergonomic furniture (DSA)
  • A computer with voice-recognition (DSA)
  • Screen magnification software (DSA)
  • Computers with screen-reading software (DSA)
  • Large screen (DSA), large text, or different display colours
Some modules use visual resources
  • Detailed figure descriptions of key visual material
  • Arranging a sighted assistant to provide descriptions (DSA)
Audio/video media clips, and interactive activities
  • Written transcripts and/or subtitles with audio-visual components
  • Some content may not be compatible with all assistive software (every effort is being made to make as many components as possible accessible); equivalent content may be created where necessary.
  • For advice you can contact our Student Recruitment and Support service, then once you've registered your student support team will advise you
Finding external or third-party material online
  • There may be an alternative version of the activity that still provides evidence of learning, for example, talking through the steps and decisions that you would have taken.
  • OU Library provides a supported literature searching service (further into qualification)
Working with specialist material (On-screen dynamically-changing graphs and mathematical expressions)
  • Dynamic graphics, mathematical notation and associated techniques may be particularly difficult to use with assistive software
  • For advice you can contact our Student Recruitment and Support service, then once you've registered your student support team will advise you
Using specialist software
(For example, the Design/Engineering Studio
  • Some content may not be compatible with all assistive software (every effort is being made to provide as much compatibility as possible) If you have any concerns contact our Student Recruitment and Support service
Study intensity

If you're a disabled student, studying is likely to take longer so take this into account

  • Take the opportunity to pace your study - one module per year or up to 60 credits per year
  • If you get behind, your tutor can help you prioritise and there are time management and study skills resources
  • An Access course could provide you with a gradual start and give you the opportunity to develop your study skills
Interaction with tutor and other students
(Mostly via online conferencing (audio, screen share and message board), forums and wikis)
  • Many modules deliver tutorials online - some are recorded for later playback
  • You can request handouts before tutorials
  • Communication support (DSA)
  • Portable personal loops if you use a hearing aid
  • You can use text messages to communicate with your tutor
  • Request written communication
  • Creating an environment that suits listening and lip-reading for any face-to-face meetings
Some modules have a residential school
  • Funding money towards transport costs (DSA)
  • Each school has a team of staff to offer support and guidance
  • An online alternative learning experience may be available
  • Specialist equipment borrowing
  • Assistants
  • Campus transport
  • Other formats (see above)
Notetaking and assignment writing
  • Digital voice recorders
  • Computers with voice-recognition and speech to text (DSA)
  • Additional arrangements for assignments

Design

Some modules within this subject area have Accessibility Guides that provide information on course elements that may present an accessibility challenge and detail on adjustments that have been made. Look for Accessibility Guide under resources/accessibility when you access your module website after enrolment.

Course elements Examples of adjustments that may be available
Reading large amounts of text

Other formats (included within the module website)

  • Ebook
  • Kindle ebook
  • Word
  • DAISY Digital Talking Book versions of module materials
  • PDF versions of webpages (for online modules)
  • PDF versions of printed material (some components may not be fully screen reader accessible)

Some formats are not available for all modules

Other formats, equipment and software:

  • Comb-bound pages which lie flat so they can be read while lying down or with a magnifier
  • Enlarged print (A4 to A3)
  • Braille production upon request in advance
  • Synthetic speech software for reading written work (DSA)
  • Equipment to convert printed text to speech (DSA)
  • Magnifiers, special glasses, task-lighting or portable CCTV text magnifiers
Considerable amounts of time using a computer and the internet
(Looking at a screen)
  • Computer skills guides, help and advice
  • Printed versions of text within online modules available upon request
  • Ergonomic furniture (DSA)
  • A computer with voice-recognition (DSA)
  • Screen magnification software (DSA)
  • Computers with screen-reading software (DSA)
  • Large screen (DSA), large text, or different display colours
Some modules use visual resources
(Design drawings and plans)
  • Detailed figure descriptions of key visual material
  • Arranging a sighted assistant to provide descriptions (DSA)
Audio/video media clips, and interactive activities
  • Written transcripts and/or subtitles with audio-visual components
  • Some content may not be compatible with all assistive software (every effort is being made to make as many components as possible accessible); alternative content may be created where necessary.
  • For advice you can contact our Student Recruitment and Support service, then once you've registered your student support team will advise you
Finding external or third-party material online
  • There may be an alternative version of the activity that still provides evidence of learning, for example, talking through the steps and decisions that you would have taken.
  • OU Library provides a supported literature searching service (further into qualification)
Working with specialist material (Design drawings, plans, photographs and mathematical expressions - Engineering and Environment routes only)
  • Dynamic graphics, mathematical notation and associated techniques may be particularly difficult to use with assistive software
  • For advice you can contact our Student Recruitment and Support service, then once you've registered your student support team will advise you
Using specialist software
(For example, an interactive web-based design studio and computer-aided modelling)
  • Some content may not be compatible with all assistive software (every effort is being made to provide as much compatibility as possible) If you have any concerns contact our Student Recruitment and Support service
Study intensity

If you're a disabled student, studying is likely to take longer so take this into account

  • Take the opportunity to pace your study - one module per year or up to 60 credits per year
  • If you get behind, your tutor can help you prioritise and there are time management and study skills resources
  • An Access course could provide you with a gradual start and give you the opportunity to develop your study skills
Interaction with tutor and other students
(Mostly via online conferencing (audio, screen share and message board), forums and wikis)
  • Many modules deliver tutorials online - some are recorded for later playback
  • You can request handouts before tutorials
  • Communication support (DSA)
  • Portable personal loops if you use a hearing aid
  • You can use text messages to communicate with your tutor
  • Request written communication
  • Creating an environment that suits listening and lip-reading for any face-to-face meetings
Notetaking and assignment writing
  • Digital voice recorders
  • Computers with voice-recognition and speech to text (DSA)
  • Additional arrangements for assignments

Education, Childhood & Youth

Some modules within this subject area have Accessibility Guides that provide information on course elements that may present an accessibility challenge and detail on adjustments that have been made. Look for Accessibility Guide under resources/accessibility when you access your module website after enrolment.

Course elements Examples of adjustments that may be available
Reading large amounts of text

Other formats (included within the module website)

  • Ebook
  • Interactive ebook
  • Kindle ebook
  • Word
  • DAISY Digital Talking Book versions of module materials
  • PDF versions of webpages (for online modules)
  • PDF versions of printed material (some components may not be fully screen reader accessible)

Some formats are not available for all modules

Other formats, equipment and software:

  • Comb-bound pages which lie flat so they can be read while lying down or with a magnifier
  • Enlarged print (A4 to A3)
  • Braille production upon request in advance
  • Synthetic speech software for reading written work (DSA)
  • Equipment to convert printed text to speech (DSA)
  • Magnifiers, special glasses, task-lighting or portable CCTV text magnifiers
Considerable amounts of time using a computer and the internet
(Looking at a screen)
  • Computer skills guides, help and advice
  • Printed versions of text within online modules available upon request
  • Ergonomic furniture (DSA)
  • A computer with voice-recognition (DSA)
  • Screen magnification software (DSA)
  • Computers with screen-reading software (DSA)
  • Large screen (DSA), large text, or different display colours
Some modules use visual resources
  • Detailed figure descriptions of key visual material
  • Arranging a sighted assistant to provide descriptions (DSA)
Audio/video media clips, and interactive activities
  • Written transcripts and/or subtitles with audio-visual components
  • Some content may not be compatible with all assistive software (every effort is being made to make as many components as possible accessible); alternative content may be created where necessary.
  • For advice you can contact our Student Recruitment and Support service, then once you've registered your student support team will advise you
Finding external or third-party material online
  • There may be an alternative version of the activity that still provides evidence of learning, for example, talking through the steps and decisions that you would have taken.
  • OU Library provides a supported literature searching service (further into qualification)
Working with specialist material
  • Some materials may be particularly difficult to use with assistive software
  • For advice you can contact our Student Recruitment and Support service, then once you've registered your student support team will advise you
Undertaking practical work
(For example, visual analysis of illustrated books, viewing and listening to sequences and recording particular features for future reference)
  • Some tasks may not be compatible with all assistive software (every effort is being made to provide as much compatibility as possible) If you have any concerns contact our Student Recruitment and Support service
Study intensity

If you're a disabled student, studying is likely to take longer so take this into account

  • Take the opportunity to pace your study - one module per year or up to 60 credits per year
  • If you get behind, your tutor can help you prioritise and there are time management and study skills resources
  • An Access course could provide you with a gradual start and give you the opportunity to develop your study skills
Interaction with tutor and other students
(Mostly via online conferencing (audio, screen share and message board), forums and wikis)
  • Many modules deliver tutorials online - some are recorded for later playback
  • You can request handouts before tutorials
  • Communication support (DSA)
  • Portable personal loops if you use a hearing aid
  • You can use text messages to communicate with your tutor
  • Request written communication
  • Creating an environment that suits listening and lip-reading for any face-to-face meetings
Notetaking and assignment writing
  • Digital voice recorders
  • Computers with voice-recognition and speech to text (DSA)
  • Additional arrangements for assignments

Engineering and Technology

Some modules within this subject area have Accessibility Guides that provide information on course elements that may present an accessibility challenge and detail on adjustments that have been made. Look for Accessibility Guide under resources/accessibility when you access your module website after enrolment.

Course elements Examples of adjustments that may be available
Reading large amounts of text

Other formats (included within the module website)

  • Ebook
  • Kindle ebook
  • Word
  • DAISY Digital Talking Book versions of module materials
  • PDF versions of webpages (for online modules)
  • PDF versions of printed material (some components may not be fully screen reader accessible)

Some formats are not available for all modules

Other formats, equipment and software:

  • Comb-bound pages which lie flat so they can be read while lying down or with a magnifier
  • Enlarged print (A4 to A3)
  • Braille production upon request in advance
  • Synthetic speech software for reading written work (DSA)
  • Equipment to convert printed text to speech (DSA)
  • Magnifiers, special glasses, task-lighting or portable CCTV text magnifiers
Considerable amounts of time using a computer and the internet
(Looking at a screen)
  • Computer skills guides, help and advice
  • Printed versions of text within online modules available upon request
  • Ergonomic furniture (DSA)
  • A computer with voice-recognition (DSA)
  • Screen magnification software (DSA)
  • Computers with screen-reading software (DSA)
  • Large screen (DSA), large text, or different display colours
Some modules use visual resources
(Design drawings and plans)
  • Detailed figure descriptions of key visual material
  • Arranging a sighted assistant to provide descriptions (DSA)
Audio/video media clips, and interactive activities
  • Written transcripts and/or subtitles with audio-visual components
  • Some content may not be compatible with all assistive software (every effort is being made to make as many components as possible accessible); alternative content may be created where necessary.
  • For advice you can contact our Student Recruitment and Support service, then once you've registered your student support team will advise you
Finding external or third-party material online
  • There may be an alternative version of the activity that still provides evidence of learning, for example, talking through the steps and decisions that you would have taken.
  • OU Library provides a supported literature searching service (further into qualification)
Working with specialist material
(For example, journal articles, technical documents and mathematical expressions)
  • Mathematical and scientific notations and associated techniques may be particularly difficult to use with assistive software
  • For advice you can contact our Student Recruitment and Support service, then once you've registered your student support team will advise you
Using specialist software
(For example, practical laboratory software and an interactive web-based design studio)
  • Some content may not be compatible with all assistive software (every effort is being made to provide as much compatibility as possible) If you have any concerns contact our Student Recruitment and Support service
Study intensity

If you're a disabled student, studying is likely to take longer so take this into account

  • Take the opportunity to pace your study - one module per year or up to 60 credits per year
  • If you get behind, your tutor can help you prioritise and there are time management and study skills resources
  • An Access course could provide you with a gradual start and give you the opportunity to develop your study skills
Interaction with tutor and other students
(Mostly via online conferencing (audio, screen share and message board), forums and wikis)
  • Many modules deliver tutorials online - some are recorded for later playback
  • You can request handouts before tutorials
  • Communication support (DSA)
  • Portable personal loops if you use a hearing aid
  • You can use text messages to communicate with your tutor
  • Request written communication
  • Creating an environment that suits listening and lip-reading for any face-to-face meetings
Some modules have a residential school
(Our Engineering accreditation has compulsory schools)
  • Funding money towards transport costs (DSA)
  • Each school has a team of staff to offer support and guidance
  • An online alternative learning experience may be available
  • Specialist equipment borrowing
  • Assistants
  • Campus transport
  • Other formats (see above)
Notetaking and assignment writing
  • Digital voice recorders
  • Computers with voice-recognition and speech to text (DSA)
  • Additional arrangements for assignments

Environment & Development

Some modules within this subject area have Accessibility Guides that provide information on course elements that may present an accessibility challenge and detail on adjustments that have been made. Look for Accessibility Guide under resources/accessibility when you access your module website after enrolment.

Course elements Examples of adjustments that may be available
Reading large amounts of text

Other formats (included within the module website)

  • Ebook
  • Interactive ebook
  • Kindle ebook
  • Word
  • PDF version of web pages
  • DAISY Digital Talking Book versions of module materials
  • PDF versions of webpages (for online modules)
  • PDF versions of printed material (some components may not be fully screen reader accessible)

Some formats are not available for all modules

Other formats, equipment and software:

  • Comb-bound pages which lie flat so they can be read while lying down or with a magnifier
  • Enlarged print (A4 to A3)
  • Braille production upon request in advance
  • Synthetic speech software for reading written work (DSA)
  • Equipment to convert printed text to speech (DSA)
  • Magnifiers, special glasses, task-lighting or portable CCTV text magnifiers
Considerable amounts of time using a computer and the internet - some modules are entirely online
(Looking at a screen)
  • Computer skills guides, help and advice
  • Printed versions of text within online modules available upon request
  • Ergonomic furniture (DSA)
  • A computer with voice-recognition (DSA)
  • Screen magnification software (DSA)
  • Computers with screen-reading software (DSA)
  • Large screen (DSA), large text, or different display colours
Some modules use visual resources
  • Detailed figure descriptions of key visual material
  • Arranging a sighted assistant to provide descriptions (DSA)
Audio/video media clips, and interactive activities
  • Written transcripts and/or subtitles with audio-visual components
  • Some content may not be compatible with all assistive software (every effort is being made to make as many components as possible accessible); alternative content may be created where necessary.
  • For advice you can contact our Student Recruitment and Support service, then once you've registered your student support team will advise you
Finding external or third-party material online
  • There may be an alternative version of the activity that still provides evidence of learning, for example, talking through the steps and decisions that you would have taken.
  • OU Library provides a supported literature searching service (further into qualification)
Working with specialist material (Mathematical and scientific expressions)
  • Mathematical notation and associated techniques may be particularly difficult to use with assistive software
  • For advice you can contact our Student Recruitment and Support service, then once you've registered your student support team will advise you
Using specialist software
  • Some content may not be compatible with all assistive software (every effort is being made to provide as much compatibility as possible) If you have any concerns contact our Student Recruitment and Support service
Study intensity

If you're a disabled student, studying is likely to take longer so take this into account

  • Take the opportunity to pace your study - one module per year or up to 60 credits per year
  • If you get behind, your tutor can help you prioritise and there are time management and study skills resources
  • An Access course could provide you with a gradual start and give you the opportunity to develop your study skills
Interaction with tutor and other students
(Mostly via online conferencing (audio, screen share and message board), forums and wikis)
  • Many modules deliver tutorials online - some are recorded for later playback
  • You can request handouts before tutorials
  • Communication support (DSA)
  • Portable personal loops if you use a hearing aid
  • You can use text messages to communicate with your tutor
  • Request written communication
  • Creating an environment that suits listening and lip-reading for any face-to-face meetings
Some modules have a residential school
  • Funding money towards transport costs (DSA)
  • Each school has a team of staff to offer support and guidance
  • An online alternative learning experience may be available
  • Specialist equipment borrowing
  • Assistants
  • Campus transport
  • Other formats (see above)
Notetaking and assignment writing
  • Digital voice recorders
  • Computers with voice-recognition and speech to text (DSA)
  • Additional arrangements for assignments

Health, Social Care & Wellbeing

Some modules within this subject area have Accessibility Guides that provide information on course elements that may present an accessibility challenge and detail on adjustments that have been made. Look for Accessibility Guide under resources/accessibility when you access your module website after enrolment.

Course elements Examples of adjustments that may be available
Reading large amounts of text

Other formats (included within the module website)

  • Ebook
  • Interactive ebook
  • Kindle ebook
  • Word
  • DAISY Digital Talking Book versions of module materials
  • PDF versions of webpages (for online modules)
  • PDF versions of printed material (some components may not be fully screen reader accessible)

Some formats are not available for all modules

Other formats, equipment and software:

  • Comb-bound pages which lie flat so they can be read while lying down or with a magnifier
  • Enlarged print (A4 to A3)
  • Braille production upon request in advance
  • Synthetic speech software for reading written work (DSA)
  • Equipment to convert printed text to speech (DSA)
  • Magnifiers, special glasses, task-lighting or portable CCTV text magnifiers
Considerable amounts of time using a computer and the internet
(Looking at a screen)
  • Computer skills guides, help and advice
  • Printed versions of text within online modules available upon request
  • Ergonomic furniture (DSA)
  • A computer with voice-recognition (DSA)
  • Screen magnification software (DSA)
  • Computers with screen-reading software (DSA)
  • Large screen (DSA), large text, or different display colours
Some modules use visual resources
(Design drawings and plans)
  • Detailed figure descriptions of key visual material
  • Arranging a sighted assistant to provide descriptions (DSA)
Audio/video media clips, and interactive activities
  • Written transcripts and/or subtitles with audio-visual components
  • Some content may not be compatible with all assistive software (every effort is being made to make as many components as possible accessible); alternative content may be created where necessary.
  • For advice you can contact our Student Recruitment and Support service, then once you've registered your student support team will advise you
Finding external or third-party material online
  • There may be an alternative version of the activity that still provides evidence of learning, for example, talking through the steps and decisions that you would have taken.
  • OU Library provides a supported literature searching service (further into qualification)
Working with specialist material
(For example, detailed illustrations, tables and graphs)
  • Some content may be particularly difficult to use with assistive software
  • For advice you can contact our Student Recruitment and Support service, then once you've registered your student support team will advise you
Using specialist software
(For example, SPSS software for statistical analysis - Psychology with Counselling route)
  • Some content may not be compatible with all assistive software (every effort is being made to provide as much compatibility as possible) If you have any concerns contact our Student Recruitment and Support service
Study intensity

If you're a disabled student, studying is likely to take longer so take this into account

  • Take the opportunity to pace your study - one module per year or up to 60 credits per year
  • If you get behind, your tutor can help you prioritise and there are time management and study skills resources
  • An Access course could provide you with a gradual start and give you the opportunity to develop your study skills
Interaction with tutor and other students
(Mostly via online conferencing (audio, screen share and message board), forums and wikis)
  • Many modules deliver tutorials online - some are recorded for later playback
  • You can request handouts before tutorials
  • Communication support (DSA)
  • Portable personal loops if you use a hearing aid
  • You can use text messages to communicate with your tutor
  • Request written communication
  • Creating an environment that suits listening and lip-reading for any face-to-face meetings
Notetaking and assignment writing
  • Digital voice recorders
  • Computers with voice-recognition and speech to text (DSA)
  • Additional arrangements for assignments

Languages

Some modules within this subject area have Accessibility Guides that provide information on course elements that may present an accessibility challenge and detail on adjustments that have been made. Look for Accessibility Guide under resources/accessibility when you access your module website after enrolment.

Course elements Examples of adjustments that may be available
Reading large amounts of text

Other formats (included within the module website)

  • Ebook
  • Interactive ebook
  • Kindle ebook
  • Word
  • DAISY Digital Talking Book versions of module materials
  • PDF versions of webpages (for online modules)
  • PDF versions of printed material (some components may not be fully screen reader accessible)

Some formats are not available for all modules

Other formats, equipment and software:

  • Comb-bound pages which lie flat so they can be read while lying down or with a magnifier
  • Enlarged print (A4 to A3)
  • Braille production upon request in advance
  • Synthetic speech software for reading written work (DSA)
  • Equipment to convert printed text to speech (DSA)
  • Magnifiers, special glasses, task-lighting or portable CCTV text magnifiers
Considerable amounts of time using a computer and the internet
(Looking at a screen)
  • Computer skills guides, help and advice
  • Printed versions of text within online modules available upon request
  • Ergonomic furniture (DSA)
  • A computer with voice-recognition (DSA)
  • Screen magnification software (DSA)
  • Computers with screen-reading software (DSA)
  • Large screen (DSA), large text, or different display colours
Some modules use visual resources
  • Detailed figure descriptions of key visual material
  • Arranging a sighted assistant to provide descriptions (DSA)
Audio/video media clips, and interactive activities
  • Written transcripts and/or subtitles with audio-visual components
  • Some content may not be compatible with all assistive software (every effort is being made to make as many components as possible accessible); alternative content may be created where necessary.
  • For advice you can contact our Student Recruitment and Support service, then once you've registered your student support team will advise you
Finding external or third-party material online
  • There may be an alternative version of the activity that still provides evidence of learning, for example, talking through the steps and decisions that you would have taken.
  • OU Library provides a supported literature searching service (further into qualification)
Working with specialist material
  • Foreign language materials may be particularly difficult to use with assistive software
  • For advice you can contact our Student Recruitment and Support service, then once you've registered your student support team will advise you
Using specialist software
(For example, there are specialist tools used within the module Exploring English grammar E303)
  • Some content may not be compatible with all assistive software (every effort is being made to provide as much compatibility as possible) If you have any concerns contact our Student Recruitment and Support service
Study intensity

If you're a disabled student, studying is likely to take longer so take this into account

  • Take the opportunity to pace your study - one module per year or up to 60 credits per year
  • If you get behind, your tutor can help you prioritise and there are time management and study skills resources
  • An Access course could provide you with a gradual start and give you the opportunity to develop your study skills
Interaction with tutor and other students
(Mostly via online conferencing (audio, screen share and message board), forums and wikis)
  • Many modules deliver tutorials online - some are recorded for later playback
  • You can request handouts before tutorials
  • Communication support (DSA)
  • Portable personal loops if you use a hearing aid
  • You can use text messages to communicate with your tutor
  • Request written communication
  • Creating an environment that suits listening and lip-reading for any face-to-face meetings
Some modules have a residential school
  • Funding money towards transport costs (DSA)
  • Each school has team of staff to offer support and guidance
  • An online alternative learning experience may be available
  • Specialist equipment borrowing
  • Assistants
  • Campus transport
  • Other formats (see above)
Notetaking and assignment writing
  • Digital voice recorders
  • Computers with voice-recognition and speech to text (DSA)
  • Additional arrangements for assignments

Law

Course elements Examples of adjustments that may be available
Reading large amounts of detailed text

Other formats (included within the module website)

  • Ebook
  • Interactive ebook
  • Kindle ebook
  • Word
  • PDF version of web pages
  • DAISY Digital Talking Book versions of module materials
  • PDF versions of webpages (for online modules)
  • PDF versions of printed material (some components may not be fully screen reader accessible)

Some formats are not available for all modules

Other formats, equipment and software:

  • Comb-bound pages which lie flat so they can be read while lying down or with a magnifier
  • Enlarged print (A4 to A3)
  • Braille production upon request in advance
  • Synthetic speech software for reading written work (DSA)
  • Equipment to convert printed text to speech (DSA)
  • Magnifiers, special glasses, task-lighting or portable CCTV text magnifiers
Considerable amounts of time using a computer and the internet
(Looking at a screen)
  • Computer skills guides, help and advice
  • Printed versions of text within online modules available upon request
  • Ergonomic furniture (DSA)
  • A computer with voice-recognition (DSA)
  • Screen magnification software (DSA)
  • Computers with screen-reading software (DSA)
  • Large screen (DSA), large text, or different display colours
Some modules use visual resources
(An optional module, Exploring legal boundaries (W350), has a visual based assessment)
  • Select optional modules that have fewer visual elements. Once you've registered, your Student Support Team can advise.
  • There are detailed figure descriptions of key visual material
  • Arranging a sighted assistant to provide descriptions (DSA)
Audio/video media clips, and interactive activities
  • Written transcripts and/or subtitles with audio-visual components
  • Some content may not be compatible with all assistive software (every effort is being made to make as many components as possible accessible); alternative content may be created where necessary.
  • For advice you can contact our Student Recruitment and Support service, then once you've registered your student support team will advise you
Finding external or third-party material online
  • There may be an alternative version of the activity that still provides evidence of learning, for example, talking through the steps and decisions that you would have taken.
  • OU Library provides a supported literature searching service (further into qualification)
Working with specialist material
(For example, legal database resources, the College of Law website)
  • Some materials may be particularly difficult to use with assistive software
  • For advice you can contact our Student Recruitment and Support service, then once you've registered your student support team will advise you
Using specialist software
  • Some content may not be compatible with all assistive software (every effort is being made to provide as much compatibility as possible) If you have any concerns contact our Student Recruitment and Support service
Study intensity

If you're a disabled student, studying is likely to take longer so take this into account

  • Take the opportunity to pace your study - one module per year or up to 60 credits per year
  • If you get behind, your tutor can help you prioritise and there are time management and study skills resources
  • An Access course could provide you with a gradual start and give you the opportunity to develop your study skills
Interaction with tutor and other students
(Mostly via online conferencing (audio, screen share and message board), forums and wikis)
  • Many modules deliver tutorials online - some are recorded for later playback
  • You can request handouts before tutorials
  • Communication support (DSA)
  • Portable personal loops if you use a hearing aid
  • You can use text messages to communicate with your tutor
  • Request written communication
  • Creating an environment that suits listening and lip-reading for any face-to-face meetings
A small number of modules have day schools
(European Union law (W330) is at a later stage of 7 qualifications and has 3 day schools)
  • Funding money towards transport costs (DSA)
  • Each school has a team of staff to offer support and guidance
  • An online alternative learning experience may be available
  • Specialist equipment borrowing
  • Assistants
  • Campus transport
  • Other formats (see above)
Notetaking and assignment writing
  • Digital voice recorders
  • Computers with voice-recognition and speech to text (DSA)
  • Additional arrangements for assignments

Mathematics & Statistics

Some modules within this subject area have Accessibility Guides that provide information on course elements that may present an accessibility challenge and detail on adjustments that have been made. Look for Accessibility Guide under resources/accessibility when you access your module website after enrolment.

Course elements Examples of adjustments that may be available
Reading large amounts of detailed text

Other formats, equipment and software:

  • PDF versions of webpages (for online modules)
  • PDF versions of printed material (some components may not be fully screen reader accessible)
  • Comb-bound pages which lie flat so they can be read while lying down or with a magnifier
  • Enlarged print (A4 to A3)
  • DAISY Digital Talking Book versions of module materials
  • Braille production upon request in advance
  • Synthetic speech software for reading written work (DSA)
  • Equipment to convert printed text to speech (DSA)
  • Magnifiers, special glasses, task-lighting or portable CCTV text magnifiers
Considerable amounts of time using a computer and the internet
(Looking at a screen)
  • Computer skills guides, help and advice
  • Printed versions of text within online modules available upon request
  • Ergonomic furniture (DSA)
  • A computer with voice-recognition (DSA)
  • Screen magnification software (DSA)
  • Computers with screen-reading software (DSA)
  • Large screen (DSA), large text, or different display colours
Some modules use visual resources
  • Detailed figure descriptions of key visual material
  • Arranging a sighted assistant to provide descriptions (DSA)
Audio/video media clips, and interactive activities
  • Written transcripts and/or subtitles with audio-visual components
  • Some content may not be compatible with all assistive software (every effort is being made to make as many components as possible accessible); alternative content may be created where necessary.
  • For advice you can contact our Student Recruitment and Support service, then once you've registered your student support team will advise you
Finding external or third-party material online
  • There may be an alternative version of the activity that still provides evidence of learning, for example, talking through the steps and decisions that you would have taken.
  • OU Library provides a supported literature searching service (further into qualification)
Working with specialist material
(For example, on-screen dynamically-changing graphs and mathematical notation)
  • Dynamic graphics, mathematical expressions, notations and associated techniques may be particularly difficult to use with assistive software
  • For advice you can contact our Student Recruitment and Support service, then once you've registered your student support team will advise you
Using specialist software
(For example, Minitab statistical software used within the module Introducing statistics M140)
  • Some content may not be compatible with all assistive software (every effort is being made to provide as much compatibility as possible) If you have any concerns contact our Student Recruitment and Support service
Study intensity

If you're a disabled student, studying is likely to take longer so take this into account

  • Take the opportunity to pace your study - one module per year or up to 60 credits per year
  • If you get behind, your tutor can help you prioritise and there are time management and study skills resources
  • An Access course could provide you with a gradual start and give you the opportunity to develop your study skills
Interaction with tutor and other students
(Mostly via online conferencing (audio, screen share and message board), forums and wikis)
  • Many modules deliver tutorials online - some are recorded for later playback
  • You can request handouts before tutorials
  • Communication support (DSA)
  • Portable personal loops if you use a hearing aid
  • You can use text messages to communicate with your tutor
  • Request written communication
  • Creating an environment that suits listening and lip-reading for any face-to-face meetings
Notetaking and assignment writing
  • Digital voice recorders
  • Computers with voice-recognition and speech to text (DSA)
  • Additional arrangements for assignments

Nursing & Healthcare Practice

Some modules within this subject area have Accessibility Guides that provide information on course elements that may present an accessibility challenge and detail on adjustments that have been made. Look for Accessibility Guide under resources/accessibility when you access your module website after enrolment.

Course elements Examples of adjustments that may be available
Reading large amounts of detailed text

Other formats (included within the module website)

  • Ebook
  • Interactive ebook
  • Kindle ebook
  • Word
  • DAISY Digital Talking Book versions of module materials
  • PDF versions of webpages (for online modules)
  • PDF versions of printed material (some components may not be fully screen reader accessible)

Some formats are not available for all modules

Other formats, equipment and software:

  • Comb-bound pages which lie flat so they can be read while lying down or with a magnifier
  • Enlarged print (A4 to A3)
  • Braille production upon request in advance
  • Synthetic speech software for reading written work (DSA)
  • Equipment to convert printed text to speech (DSA)
  • Magnifiers, special glasses, task-lighting or portable CCTV text magnifiers
Considerable amounts of time using a computer and the internet
(Looking at a screen)
  • Computer skills guides, help and advice
  • Printed versions of text within online modules available upon request
  • Ergonomic furniture (DSA)
  • A computer with voice-recognition (DSA)
  • Screen magnification software (DSA)
  • Computers with screen-reading software (DSA)
  • Large screen (DSA), large text, or different display colours
Some modules use visual resources
  • Detailed figure descriptions of key visual material
  • Arranging a sighted assistant to provide descriptions (DSA)
Audio/video media clips, and interactive activities
  • Written transcripts and/or subtitles with audio-visual components
  • Some content may not be compatible with all assistive software (every effort is being made to make as many components as possible accessible); alternative content may be created where necessary.
  • For advice you can contact our Student Recruitment and Support service, then once you've registered your student support team will advise you
Finding external or third-party material online
  • There may be an alternative version of the activity that still provides evidence of learning, for example, talking through the steps and decisions that you would have taken.
  • OU Library provides a supported literature searching service (further into qualification)
Working with specialist material
(For example, scientific expressions)
  • Scientific expressions, notations and associated techniques may be particularly difficult to use with assistive software
  • For advice you can contact our Student Recruitment and Support service, then once you've registered your student support team will advise you
Undertaking nursing practical work
  • Some tasks may require support and adjustments (every effort is being made to provide as much accessibility as possible) If you have any concerns contact our Student Recruitment and Support service
Study intensity

If you're a disabled student, studying is likely to take longer so take this into account

  • Take the opportunity to pace your study - one module per year or up to 60 credits per year
  • If you get behind, your tutor can help you prioritise and there are time management and study skills resources
  • An Access course could provide you with a gradual start and give you the opportunity to develop your study skills
Interaction with tutor and other students
(Mostly via online conferencing (audio, screen share and message board), forums and wikis)
  • Many modules deliver tutorials online - some are recorded for later playback
  • You can request handouts before tutorials
  • Communication support (DSA)
  • Portable personal loops if you use a hearing aid
  • You can use text messages to communicate with your tutor
  • Request written communication
  • Creating an environment that suits listening and lip-reading for any face-to-face meetings
Notetaking and assignment writing
  • Digital voice recorders
  • Computers with voice-recognition and speech to text (DSA)
  • Additional arrangements for assignments

Science and Medical Sciences

Some modules within this subject area have Accessibility Guides that provide information on course elements that may present an accessibility challenge and detail on adjustments that have been made. Look for Accessibility Guide under resources/accessibility when you access your module website after enrolment.

Course elements Examples of adjustments that may be available
Reading large amounts of text

Other formats (some are available from your module website):

  • Ebook
  • Interactive ebook
  • Kindle ebook
  • Word
  • DAISY Digital Talking Book versions of module materials
  • PDF versions of webpages (for online modules)
  • PDF versions of other material (some components may not be fully screen reader accessible)

Some formats are not available for all modules

Other formats, equipment and software:

  • Comb-bound pages which lie flat so they can be read while lying down or with a magnifier
  • Enlarged print (A4 to A3)
  • Braille production upon request in advance
  • Synthetic speech software for reading written work (DSA)
  • Equipment to convert printed text to speech (DSA)
  • Magnifiers, special glasses, task-lighting or portable CCTV text magnifiers
Considerable amounts of time using a computer and the internet - many modules are entirely online
(Looking at a screen)
  • Computer skills guides, help and advice
  • Printed versions of text within online modules available upon request
  • Ergonomic furniture (DSA)
  • A computer with voice-recognition (DSA)
  • Screen magnification software (DSA)
  • Computers with screen-reading software (DSA)
  • Large screen (DSA), large text, or different display colours
Some modules use visual resources
(For example: graphs, animations and chemical structures)
  • Detailed figure descriptions for key figures
  • Arranging a sighted assistant to provide descriptions (DSA)
  • Tactile versions for some diagrams may be available on request
Audio/video media clips, and interactive activities
  • Written transcripts and/or subtitles with audio-visual components
  • Some content may not be compatible with all assistive software (every effort is being made to make as many components as possible accessible); alternative content may be created where necessary.
  • For advice you can contact our Student Recruitment and Support service, then once you've registered your student support team will advise you
Finding external or third-party material online
  • OU Library provides a supported literature searching service
  • There may be an alternative version of the activity that still provides evidence of learning, for example, talking through the steps and decisions that you would have taken.
Working with specialist material (Using mathematical and scientific notation and expressions)
  • Mathematical and scientific notation and expressions may be particularly difficult to use with assistive software
  • For advice you can contact our Student Recruitment and Support service, then once you've registered your student support team will advise you
Undertaking practical work
(Home-based and virtual practical work)
  • Some activities may require support and adjustments (although every effort is made to make these accessible for all students)
  • Alternative versions of practical tasks may be available
Study intensity

If you're a disabled student, studying is likely to take longer so take this into account

  • Take the opportunity to pace your study - one module per year or up to 60 credits per year
  • If you get behind, your tutor can help you prioritise and there are time management and study skills resources
  • An Access course could provide you with a gradual start and give you the opportunity to develop your study skills
Interaction with tutor and other students - including collaborative group work
(Mostly via online conferencing (audio, screen share and message board), forums and wikis)
  • Many modules deliver tutorials online - some are recorded for later playback
  • You can request handouts before tutorials
  • Communication support (DSA)
  • Portable personal loops if you use a hearing aid
  • You can use text messages to communicate with your tutor
  • Request written communication
  • Creating an environment that suits listening and lip-reading for any face-to-face meetings
Some modules have a residential school
(Some modules have optional or compulsory residential schools’)
  • Funding money towards transport costs (DSA)
  • Each school has team of staff to offer support and guidance
  • An alternative learning experience may be available
  • Specialist equipment borrowing
  • Assistants
  • Campus transport
  • Other formats (see above)
Notetaking and assignment writing
  • Digital voice recorders
  • Computers with voice-recognition and speech to text (DSA)
  • Additional arrangements for assignments

Psychology, Social Sciences and Counselling

Course elements Examples of adjustments that may be available
Reading large amounts of text

Other formats (some are available from your module website):

  • Ebook
  • Kindle ebook
  • Word
  • DAISY Digital Talking Book versions of module materials
  • PDF versions of webpages (for online modules)
  • PDF versions of printed material (some components may not be fully screen reader accessible)

Some formats are not available for all modules

Other formats, equipment and software:

  • Comb-bound pages which lie flat so they can be read while lying down or with a magnifier
  • Enlarged print (A4 to A3)
  • Braille production upon request in advance
  • Synthetic speech software for reading written work (DSA)
  • Equipment to convert printed text to speech (DSA)
  • Magnifiers, special glasses, task-lighting or portable CCTV text magnifiers
Considerable amounts of time using a computer and the internet
(Looking at a screen)
  • Computer skills guides, help and advice
  • Printed versions of text within online modules available upon request
  • Ergonomic furniture (DSA)
  • A computer with voice-recognition (DSA)
  • Screen magnification software (DSA)
  • Computers with screen-reading software (DSA)
  • Large screen (DSA), large text, or different display colours
Some modules use visual resources
  • Detailed figure descriptions of key visual material
  • Arranging a sighted assistant to provide descriptions (DSA)
Audio/video media clips, and interactive activities
  • Written transcripts and/or subtitles with audio-visual components
  • Some content may not be compatible with all assistive software (every effort is being made to make as many components as possible accessible); alternative content may be created where necessary.
  • For advice you can contact our Student Recruitment and Support service, then once you've registered your student support team will advise you
Finding external or third-party material online
  • There may be an alternative version of the activity that still provides evidence of learning, for example, talking through the steps and decisions that you would have taken.
  • OU Library provides a supported literature searching service (further into qualification)
Working with specialist material
(For example, scientific expressions and associated techniques)
  • Mathematical and scientific notation and expressions may be particularly difficult to use with assistive software
  • For advice you can contact our Student Recruitment and Support service, then once you've registered your student support team will advise you
Using specialist software
(For example, SPSS software for statistical analysis)
  • Some content may not be compatible with all assistive software (every effort is being made to provide as much compatibility as possible) If you have any concerns contact our Student Recruitment and Support service
Study intensity

If you're a disabled student, studying is likely to take longer so take this into account

  • Take the opportunity to pace your study - one module per year or up to 60 credits per year
  • If you get behind, your tutor can help you prioritise and there are time management and study skills resources
  • An Access course could provide you with a gradual start and give you the opportunity to develop your study skills
Interaction with tutor and other students
(Mostly via online conferencing (audio, screen share and message board), forums and wikis)
  • Many modules deliver tutorials online - some are recorded for later playback
  • You can request handouts before tutorials
  • Communication support (DSA)
  • Portable personal loops if you use a hearing aid
  • You can use text messages to communicate with your tutor
  • Request written communication
  • Creating an environment that suits listening and lip-reading for any face-to-face meetings
Notetaking and assignment writing
  • Digital voice recorders
  • Computers with voice-recognition and speech to text (DSA)
  • Additional arrangements for assignments

If you suspect that any of your course elements will be a challenge, OU support and DSA-funded support will provide adjustments and strategies to help you achieve a level playing field.

Go to the Courses homepage

Ready to register? Now find the right course

If you're still unclear about overcoming barriers to studying you can:

  • message your peers on the OU Students Association (OUSA) Disabled Student Group Facebook page,
  • contact our Student Recruitment and Support service on 0300 303 5303
  • and choose to study an Access Course before your qualification.
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